More Reckless Spending on the Way

The bill’s price tag comes in at over $800 billion. This on top of the $700 billion stimulus package passed last year. That bill was loaded with “gimmees” and handouts to banks which now claim they can’t show where the money went (give us a break! Bankers know where every dime of the money is). And don’t forget the $168 billion tax rebate “stimulus package” from 2007. That handout also failed to stimulate the economy.

Democrats prepare to saddle future generations with nearly a trillion dollars in additional debt

By Chris Ingram

Barack Obama is our new president calling for change, but nothing has changed other than Washington politicians leaving nothing but change in the pockets of our children.

The Democrats’ “economic stimulus” package is nothing more than another Congressional attempt to pass a spending bill with a sense of urgency that ultimately is only designed to get members re-elected.

The bill’s price tag comes in at over $800 billion. This on top of the $700 billion stimulus package passed last year. That bill was loaded with “gimmees” and handouts to banks which now claim they can’t show where the money went (give us a break! Bankers know where every dime of the money is). And don’t forget the $168 billion tax rebate “stimulus package” from 2007. That handout also failed to stimulate the economy.

Are we starting to see a pattern here? Why do we expect that the clowns who caused the economic problem are the people we should entrust to save us?

The pending $800 billion plan is loaded with pork to big business, special interests, the National Endowment for the Arts (apparently government subsidized paintings is a vital part of the economy). Don’t be surprised to find out that there is money to study the mating habits of pelicans in there before it’s all over.

The biggest handout is a $300 tax rebate for Social Security recipients.

Now I’m all for helping out the elderly, but this type of targeted “assistance” is nothing more than a bribe from Congressional Democrats to the most reliable group of voters in America. And for the life of me, I don’t see how with good conscience any politician can vote for this bill knowing the added debt it will incur on our children and grandchildren.

Oh, and don’t forget further tax cuts for people who don’t even pay federal income taxes.

The biggest kicker of all is this: the $800 billion plan has spending spread out over six years. That is, Congress, in its infinite wisdom to immediately spark the nation’s sour economy thinks dedicated allocations in 2012 and beyond is necessary to jump-start our economy today.

This isn’t a matter of sound financial planning of paying as we go, or spending as we need it. It’s a simple matter of Congressional Democrats dedicating money we don’t have for future programs so they can hand out more pork in years to come so they can get re-elected. Can anyone say, “slush fund?” Five years from now it will take further congressional action to cut/cancel these spending programs. Anyone think that’s going to happen?

But hey, who is really to blame? We are. We elected these clowns. And nothing has changed.

Chris Ingram is the president and founder of 411 Communications a corporate and political communications firm, and publisher of http://www.IrreverentView.com. Ingram is a frequent pundit on Fox News and CNN, and has written opinion columns for the Washington Times, UPI, Front Page Florida, and National Review online. E-mail him at: Chris@411Communications.net.

2 thoughts on “More Reckless Spending on the Way”

  1. (posted via e-mail)

    Chris-

    I agree with your latest blog on many fronts. Even as someone who leans left, I think these congressional appropriations are meaningless to all but those interests who will be receiving windfall pork while my kid and I receive the bill over the next 40 years. We really must do something to change the culture of whining baby entitlement in our great country.

    There us one thing, however, to which I take exception. Your suggestion that money for the NEA is a waste. Even if you think Roosevelt’s WPA was an enormous boondoggle, you can’t deny the power of the artwork and amazing photodocumentation of american cultrte produced by the artists and documentarians who would have starved if not for the governments grants to them during the depression.

    The newest airside at the Tampa airport, for example, is decorated with restored WPA murals. Have you seen them? They’re wonderful, even if not at all high art. Everyone flying in for the stupid bowl will be seeing them in our gorgeous airport.

    I reject the notion that support for the arts is private patron’s responsibility alone. A great country deserves great art, and ours underfunds the arts in a woeful way.

    I can think of no higher calling than to be a working artist. I’m not talking about Jeff Koons here, I’m talking about, in retrospect, how Maplethorpe’s work, long rejected by the conservative critics of the NEA as pornography, reflects our zeitgeist today in a way noone expected in the 80s.

    Have you ever been to the Prado Museum in Madrid or the Louvre in Paris? How about the Smithsonian in Washington? Each of those institutions could not exist without substantial government funding.

    The great kings of Europe’s most lasting gift to their nations has been their patronage of the old masters. Great art in private collections does nothing for the people of their society. Only public art can inspire the masses.

    So I say double, even triple the funding for the arts in the USA. It will help real people make lasting contributions to our culture with the side benefit of helping them feed their families by making, can you believe it, art. Real artists should not have to wait tables to afford to be artists.

    Art is not a dirty word. It is one to be held as high as it can be, one of the lights of the culture and a hope for all people, not just the rich.

    I suggest that bashing the arts is an easy target with little substance, sort of like bashing welfare mothers. You can do better, my friend.

    Thanks for reading my rant…You’re welcome to publish this in whole or part as a comment on your blog. Have a great weekend. I’ll be reading law on Sunday, maybe doing some laundry, but not likely watching the stupid bowl.

    Njoy,

    CR

    Like

  2. (Via e-mail)

    Chris,

    I liked your article: “More Reckless Spending on the Way”. You are preaching to the choir here. I have been researching the causes of the economic tsunami, and it is hard to find exact legislation and by party vote count.
    I am convinced the strengthening of the Community Reinvestment Act in 1995 played a significant role, but I don’t know the title of the legislation, or the vote count. I also think the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 (CFMA) played a MAJOR role in exacerbating the abuse of excessive leverage in the housing market. I was able to trace it to Phil Grahm, but the vote was nearly unanimous in the house, and was unanimous in the senate, and signed by Clinton. All this was done in a hurry at the 23rd hr. of session immediately before Christmas break in 2000.
    I don’t know when the S.E.C. ceased to do their jobs overseeing the rating agencies, or why that happened, do you? I have never bought in to the idea that it was *greed on wall St.* that caused the financial crisis leading to this recession. I think greed is a constant, much like gravity, and it has not changed appreciably in any of our lives.
    Things do happen for reasons, however, and it does make sense to me that some event/s, or condition/s had to have happened, or come into being a decade or more in advance of the economic crisis that set the table for things to come. You asked an interesting question in your article:

    “Why do we expect that the clowns who caused the economic problem are the people we should entrust to save us?”

    I’m sure you were referring to government as the clown who caused the problem. Do you have any legislation, and dates, and vote counts that you could share with me.

    Like

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