The day that America lost its innocence

Sept. 11, 2001, started off as an unusually beautiful day in the Washington, D.C., area. I left for the office early to prepare for a day on Capitol Hill, where a client would be testifying before a House committee about the national nursing shortage.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published September 9, 2011

Sept. 11, 2001, started off as an unusually beautiful day in the Washington, D.C., area. I left for the office early to prepare for a day on Capitol Hill, where a client would be testifying before a House committee about the national nursing shortage.

At my office I had the TV on when I heard the news that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. No one seemed to know something terrorist-related was occurring until the second building was hit. Like many Americans I watched with dismay as the events occurred on live TV.

I called the staff director of the committee where my client would be speaking later to see if the hearing was still a go. To my surprise, she said the hearing was still on, so I walked a block to the Rosslyn Metro station and headed to Capitol Hill.

I got off the train and went to the Cannon House Office Building to make my way to the hearing room. I had just passed through the metal detector when Capitol Hill police officers began running down the halls announcing to everyone to evacuate the building.

It quickly dawned on me that the terror threat in New York City was upon us. (Click here to read the full column in the Tampa Tribune).  

 

Chris Ingram is the president and founder of 411 Communications a corporate and political communications firm, and publisher of Irreverent View. Ingram is a frequent pundit on Fox News and CNN, and has written opinion columns for the Washington Times, UPI, and National Review online. He is the Republican political analyst for Bay News 9, the only 24 hour all news channel in Florida’s largest media market. The opinions expressed here are those of author and do not represent the views of Bay News 9. E-mail him atChris@IrreverentView.com.

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3 thoughts on “The day that America lost its innocence”

  1. Ola! Irreverentview,
    This question may be a little off-topic, The Civil War era, the age of industrialization in the early 1900’s, WWII at the dropping of the A-Bomb, or potentially the rockin’ 50’s or hippy 60’s? Or most likely one more time?
    Good Job!

    Like

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