Watch out for the politically correct police — they’re on the warpath

The New England Patriots have perhaps the most racially insensitive name in all of professional sports. The origin of the team name is based on those who fought the British crown and gave America its independence. If you’re to believe today’s history books (as written by the PCP), these were bad men who were mostly white, wealthy and slave-holders who used mob violence to get their way.

By Chris Ingram

Almost as predictably as the decennial census, every decade or so the politically correct police (PCP) aim their sights on the Washington Redskins, for what they view as the team’s racist name.

Although the intended meaning of an individual’s usage of a word, and how it is interpreted by those who hear it is subjective, Smithsonian Institution senior linguist Ives Goddard has concluded that the term “redskin” was first used by Native Americans in the 18th century to distinguish themselves from whites.

Former Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke said, “I admire the Redskins name. I think it stands for bravery, courage, and a stalwart spirit, and I see no reason why we shouldn’t continue to use it.”

Daniel Snyder, who is the current owner of the National Football League team, has said he will never change the name because “what it means is tradition, what it means is competitiveness, what it means is honor.” Adding, “It is not meant to be derogatory.”

But facts about the origins of the word, or the intent of owners current or past, are not relevant to the PCP.

But why should they stop there?

Verlin Deer In Water

In an effort to help them with their efforts to make the world as politically correct as possible, I have compiled the following short list of other team names that should be changed. Like the Redskins team name controversy, these are based on ignorance of facts and renaming any of the following would do nothing to actually make the world a better place.

This being Tampa, we should start with the Buccaneers. A Buccaneer, of course, is akin to a pirate. Pirates rape, rob and plunder. These are bad people, and they are extremely dangerous and threatening. The Bucs should rename the “pro-violence” name they have and change it to one that would more adequately reflect the team when it is on the field. I suggest the Tampa Bay Continue reading “Watch out for the politically correct police — they’re on the warpath”

Finally! The media gets it right about the two biggest losers in politics!

Scorsch who routinely and unapologetically lies publicly to the press, who owes nearly $68,000 in outstanding fines to the Florida Elections Commission, who six years pleaded no contest to grand thef and scheming to defraud charges. Really?

Ready for the NFL, Charlie Crist?

Friday, October 25, 2013 3:40pm

“Welcome to the NFL,” Charlie Crist used to say of Marco Rubio, when the insurgent Republican complained about Crist’s attacks in 2010.

We’re just days away from Crist announcing his campaign for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and it’s unclear whether Crist will be playing like he’s in the NFL or the Pop Warner League.

Looks like blogger/consultant/man about town Peter Schorsch pulled the permit for Crist’s first campaign rally/announcement. Now I’m a big fan of Schorsch’s web site and more than once  have enjoyed a martini or three with Schorsch.

But Crist already has a history of lousy judgement in leaning heavily dubious supporters (Scott Rothstein, Jim Greer, Alan Mendelsohn, Greg Eagle) who have a knack for winding up in prison. Count on that to be part of the campaign against him over the next 12 months.

Still, for his very campaign event Crist turned to Scorsch who routinely and unapologetically lies publicly to the press, who owes nearly $68,000 in outstanding fines to the Florida Elections Commission, who six years pleaded no contest to grand thef and scheming to defraud charges. Really?

Crist today launched a Web site, CharlieCrist.com. What struck us first about it  is that it included no disclosure text saying who funded, as is required for campaign sites. Crist is in gray area as an unannounced candidate, of course, but it seems the campaign felt a little uneasy about the disclosure rules too. The site has been amended to say: “Paid for Personally by Charlie Crist.” (Click here for the full story in the Tampa Bay Times)

Feel free to leave your comments about this story here.

The Republicans’ “strategic incompetence”

The Republicans clearly lost the PR battle over the shutdown and the debt ceiling limit extension. Unfortunately for the GOP, the spiraling federal debt as an issue of concern appears lost on most people. It’s significance is quite simple really: The money we’ve borrowed will have to be paid back, and it’s going to be painful.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune, October 19, 2013

You might call the Republicans’ recent efforts related to the federal government shutdown and their battle with the Democrats over the debt ceiling as “strategic incompetence.” 

Strategic incompetence is the act of appearing to not know what you are doing, all the while, knowing exactly what you want to accomplish by pretending to be incompetent.

My friend Roy engages in strategic incompetence from time to time. For example, after his wife had their son, Roy decided he didn’t like changing diapers. So he would pretend to be incompetent by fumbling with the diapers, never getting the child clean enough, and otherwise incorrectly changing the diaper and upsetting the baby. In the end, his wife believed Roy was not competent to change the diapers, and she told him he didn’t have to do it anymore — which is exactly what Roy wanted.

By shutting the government down over the train wreck that is known as Obamacare and having threatened to not increase the debt ceiling, the Republicans appeared — just as Roy appeared in the eyes of his lovely wife — to be incompetent in the eyes of voters.

The strategic part of the GOP’s shutdown and debt ceiling plan was Continue reading “The Republicans’ “strategic incompetence””

A year after Tampa, can the GOP fix itself with a third party?

Unfortunately for the GOP, there is truth to both concerns, and the present dichotomy between these two views from within the party is unenviable.

The problem is compounded by the fact that millions of people are abandoning the Republicans (as well as the Democrats), preferring instead to register with no-party affiliation.

So what is the GOP to do?

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune, August 27, 2013

One year ago, the GOP convention came to town, albeit delayed for a day because of sensitivities to what Tropical Storm Isaac, brewing in the Gulf of Mexico, might do.

As Isaac passed and the party began to convene, Republicans began what they thought was the last leg of their road to retake the White House. The convention ended up being a seemingly seamless and perfectly choreographed affair — unless you consider the Isaac issue, Clint Eastwood’s performance with “Obama’s chair,” or the fact that the assembled delegates on the convention floor looked whiter than a bowl of cottage cheese.

Mitt Romney left the convention without much movement in the polls, and days later, the Democrats met in Charlotte, where they held one of their most successful conventions in recent times.

The hopes of Republican voters jumped after the first debate, but Romney couldn’t sustain the enthusiasm and lost big to Obama on Election Day.

Caption: Delegates cheer for Mitt Romney at the Republican Convention in Tampa last year.
Caption: Delegates cheer for Mitt Romney at the Republican Convention in Tampa last year.

For the GOP, the Tampa convention and the Romney campaign with the flaws that came with the candidate are now mere asterisks in the annals of party history. The question is, what have we learned since, and when will the party change?

Since the election, the most common comments I hear about the party contain one of two views, one being Continue reading “A year after Tampa, can the GOP fix itself with a third party?”

Democrats call for ban on…

Speaking from the floor of the House of Representatives on Thursday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said she would introduce an immediate emergency ban of pressure cooker and slow cooker sales. Pelosi believes such a ban would be legal under Article 1, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution.

By Chris Ingram

Satire

Retail stores nationwide reported a run on pressure cookers and slow cookers (Crock-Pots), following plans by congressional Democrats and the White House to ban sales of the small appliances following Monday’s tragic bombing in Boston in which pressure cookers were the weapon of choice. The FBI found remnants of a cooker they believe was filled with nails and packed with explosives. The bombing killed three people.

Speaking from the floor of the House of Representatives on Thursday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said she would introduce an immediate emergency ban of pressure cooker and slow cooker sales. Pelosi believes such a ban would be legal under Article 1, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution.

“The Commerce Clause provides wide latitude for the government to regulate dangerous weapons such as these. We are working with Senate Democrats and the president to ensure these weapons of civil destruction don’t end up in the wrong hands,” Pelosi said.

As he took a drag on a cigarette while walking into a tanning salon on Capitol Hill, House Speaker John Boehner mused, “Pressure cookers and Crock-Pots Continue reading “Democrats call for ban on…”

Buffett Rules!

Buffett rules are good for America. They bring harmony, sharing and fairness to Americans. I don’t understand all the haters of the Buffett rule. Perhaps the lawmakers overreached (again) and wrote a bill laced with some poison pill pork projects that had to be voted down. Perhaps I could take a stab at some legalese that will establish a Buffett Law that is sure to satisfy Congress and the rest of Americans.

An irreverent view of the “Buffett Rules”

By Shamus McConomy

Buffett rules are good for America. They bring harmony, sharing and fairness to Americans.  I don’t understand all the haters of the Buffett rule. Perhaps the lawmakers overreached (again) and wrote a bill laced with some poison pill pork projects that had to be voted down. Perhaps I could take a stab at some legalese that will establish a Buffett Law that is sure to satisfy Congress and the rest of Americans.

Continue reading “Buffett Rules!”

Will Ron Paul upset the apple cart?

Republican or Democrat, you can’t argue with the fact that our politicians in Washington are failing the American people.

The other day the GOP finally caved to the realization that playing politics with middle-class tax relief was a losing proposition.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published January 1, 2012

Republican or Democrat, you can’t argue with the fact that our politicians in Washington are failing the American people.

The other day the GOP finally caved to the realization that playing politics with middle-class tax relief was a losing proposition.

Meanwhile, the Democrats and President Obama play politics with our nation’s energy dependence (or lack thereof) by denying the application of an oil company to build an oil pipeline from Alberta, Canada, to refineries in Texas.

Both parties are complicit in excessive government spending, a complicated tax code that benefits special interests, and a complete lack of responsibility about the staggering national debt — currently at $15 trillion. To understand how bad the debt situation is consider this: You would have to spend $1 million a day for the next 2,739 years to blow through a trillion dollars. Now multiply by 15.

The only thing the two parties generally agree on (albeit behind closed doors) is Continue reading “Will Ron Paul upset the apple cart?”