Going back to work, one regulation at a time

This ill-conceived attempt to help curve Florida’s dismal employment numbers wrongly assumes several things and ignores other more important considerations. In essence, this bill is a politician’s attempt to heal a heart attack victim by placing a Band-Aid on another patient’s broken toe. One can only assume this is being done because said politician has no idea how to heal the heart attack victim.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Wednesday, January 31, 2013

“Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy.” — Ernest Benn, British author

Apparently having given up completely on the idea of individual freedom, free markets and fewer government regulations, the Republican-dominated Florida Legislature is considering a bill (SB 100) sponsored by Rep. Nancy Detert, R-Venice, that would prohibit employers from considering a prospective employee’s credit report as a part of the hiring process.

This ill-conceived attempt to help curve Florida’s dismal employment numbers wrongly assumes several things and ignores other more important considerations. In essence, this bill is a politician’s attempt to heal a heart attack victim by placing a Band-Aid on another patient’s broken toe. One can only assume this is being done because said politician has no idea how to heal the heart attack victim.

In this case, the heart attack represents Continue reading “Going back to work, one regulation at a time”

All our kids (should) want for Christmas is $86 trillion

They’re getting ready to punt again, with President Obama and Speaker Boehner working on a compromise that would include tax increases, spending cuts and an extension of the debt ceiling. Although the tax increases and spending cuts are a good start, they’re a mere drop in the bucket. A $400 billion unspecified cut in entitlement spending here and a $440 billion tax increase there (both over a period of 10 years), won’t do anything other than symbolize the need to do something. Those mediocre attempts to rectify an $86 trillion debt would be like throwing a gallon of water on a five-alarm fire of a completely engulfed building that stretches for several city blocks.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Saturday, December 22, 2012

Photo: My kids. Caption: The next generation is getting screwed.
Photo: My kids. Caption: The next generation is getting screwed.

If the 1960s are most remembered for the Kennedy and King assassinations and the fight for racial equality, and the ’70s for Watergate, Vietnam protests and the gas crisis, the ’80s for the fall of the Berlin Wall and Ronald Reagan’s optimism, the ’90s for the tech boom and Bill Clinton’s intern, the 2000s for the September 11th tragedy and the election of the first black president, the decade of 2010 will be defined by the bankruptcy of America.

You could write tomes explaining how this happened and who is to blame, but that won’t solve the problem. The fact is, America is broke, and it’s only a matter of time before we face the upheaval seen in Greece (in 2011, only Greece, Italy and Japan had higher debt as a percentage of GDP than the United States). The only reason we aren’t there yet is due to our politicians’ proclivity for punting.

They’re getting ready to punt again, with President Obama and Speaker Boehner working on a compromise that would include Continue reading “All our kids (should) want for Christmas is $86 trillion”

A message to Romney and Obama

The next generation is the first generation in American history that is not expected to have a better quality of life than the one that came before it. All Americans should be ashamed of this. Most parents frequently remind their kids to share and to think about others, but no one seems to be thinking about them.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Saturday, November 5, 2012

Dear Gov. Romney and President Obama:

No matter who wins the election for the presidency tomorrow, many Americans are hopeful the winner will make changes that improve the long-term prospects for our nation’s children. For years, Republican and Democrat politicians alike have ignored long-term problems that will affect the next generation, in favor of taking care of those who will vote for them in the next election.

Not only does the next generation not have a say (because they can’t vote), they also don’t get many of the benefits that are targeted to other segments of the population. The real whopper is, they also get stuck with the bills for all of the goodies that went to everybody else.

To fix this problem, it will be necessary Continue reading “A message to Romney and Obama”

The war on success

By Mike Matteo

When I was a kid I used to watch the television show Bonanza every Sunday evening on NBC.  As many of you remember, the protagonist of the show was a wealthy ranch owner, Ben Cartwright.  He and his sons, (Adam, Hoss and Little Joe) went out of their way to take the high and moral road regardless of how much pain and suffering it cost them.  They would always come to the defense of the poor and downtrodden, not because of any government mandate, but because it was the right thing to do.  The show ran from 1959 to 1973.

Five years later Continue reading “The war on success”

5 things Obama doesn’t want to think about

Ever the arrogant one, President Obama is crisscrossing the northeast like a pre-Election Day Santa Clause in the post-hurricane Sandy aftermath. Democrats are no doubt secretly thankful that the storm has taken Benghazi and the lackluster economy off of the front pages of the newspapers and the blogosphere. But in their gleeful moment, they shouldn’t get too confident. Here’s why:

 By Chris Ingram

Ever the arrogant one, President Obama is crisscrossing the northeast like a pre-Election Day Santa Clause in the post-hurricane Sandy aftermath. Democrats are no doubt secretly thankful that the storm has taken Benghazi and the lackluster economy off of the front pages of the newspapers and the blogosphere. But in their gleeful moment, they shouldn’t get too confident. Here’s why:

Obama Clause: Ho-ho-ho! Big government makes the people happy!

1) American voters have short memories, but they aren’t altogether stupid. Sure the TV moments with storm victims may help the president a bit, but who among the storm victims are going to vote for this guy just because he showed up to do what the president is supposed to do in these instances? No one. Anyone who would vote for him just for being the “comforter in chief” is an idiot who was probably going to vote for him anyway. And those short memories still remember they don’t have a job, that their kids’ future is not as bright as it used to be, and that the economy is currently floating on Monopoly money. Besides, most of the storm states were going to Obama (blue states) anyway.

2) The media has widely reported how Continue reading “5 things Obama doesn’t want to think about”

Things for the Flori-duh Legislature to consider

I digress; that’s old news. But the players haven’t changed much, and I’m not optimistic that the same knuckleheads in Tallahassee, who in the midst of an economic recession last year spent four days talking about abortion and just one day talking about jobs, will get their priorities in order.

Instead of just complaining about what a bunch of out-of-touch do-nothings they are, I’ve made a list of a few things the Legislature ought to consider. They are:

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published January 10, 2012

Call in the kids, lock your doors, and cover your eyes and ears, the “Flori-duh” Legislature convenes today to conduct its annual business.

Last year’s embarrassing session saw Senate President Mike Haridopolous outmaneuvered by the House. This shouldn’t come as a surprise, considering this is the same guy who wrote a book with finger paint and got paid $150,000 to do so by some Podunk community college. The book sold about 100 copies.

I digress; that’s old news. But the players haven’t changed much, and I’m not optimistic that the same knuckleheads in Tallahassee, who in the midst of an economic recession last year spent four days talking about abortion and just one day talking about jobs, will get their priorities in order.

Instead of just complaining about what a bunch of out-of-touch do-nothings they are, I’ve made a list of a few things the Legislature ought to consider. They are: Continue reading “Things for the Flori-duh Legislature to consider”

Jon Huntsman’s path to victory

With his upbeat attitude and serious focus on the issues, Huntsman makes a convincing case for his candidacy. Until now, he has been largely dismissed by both pundits and party activists – the latter whom wrongly conclude Huntsman is a moderate.

And a few things his opponents would rather you forget

By Chris Ingram

Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman was in Florida yesterday. A light day of campaigning was preceded by a coveted appearance on NBC’s Meet the Press in which Huntsman raised the issue of GOP frontrunner Mitt Romney’s electability and his repeated flip-flops.

Photo: Jon Huntsman (center) speaks with supporters Linda and Gerald Albrecht of Tampa.

 

Following his TV appearance, Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric (who is not currently supporting anyone in the presidential contest) Tweeted, “Wow! Huntsman performance MTP (Meet the Press) very impressive. Thoughful and Presidential. Better 1on1 than debate. Deserves a second look”

From CEO’s like Welch to the few everyday Americans who are actually paying attention to the race, voters are still looking for a believable leader who lacks the baggage of candidates like Caine and Gingrich and the poll-tested and plastic nature of Mitt Romney. Huntsman may be the answer, but a lot of stars will have to line up in a row for Huntsman to become the nominee.

Live free or die

Metaphorically speaking, Huntsman has Continue reading “Jon Huntsman’s path to victory”