Addressing gun violence one bumper-sticker solution at a time

But would banning ice cream sales result in a reduction in the number of rapes? Almost certainly not. Why? Because the correlation does not demonstrate the causation. Looked at another way, they have a shared cause, but there is no correlation. The cause in both cases is hotter temperatures. That is, rape is more likely to occur in warmer months, just as ice cream sales shoot up during the hot summer season. Banning the sale of ice cream to reduce rape makes about as much sense as banning guns to reduce violence.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Tuesday, February 27, 2013

Most anyone who has taken a statistics class has heard the example of the incidence of rape rising when sales of ice cream increase. Does that mean rape is more likely to occur as ice cream sales rise? The evidence says yes.

But would banning ice cream sales result in a reduction in the number of rapes? Almost certainly not. Why? Because the correlation does not demonstrate the causation. Looked at another way, they have a shared cause, but there is no correlation. The cause in both cases is hotter temperatures. That is, rape is more likely to occur in warmer months, just as ice cream sales shoot up during the hot summer season. Banning the sale of ice cream to reduce rape makes about as much sense as banning guns to reduce violence.

We get bombarded with stats, figures and polling data every day. Much of this, particularly the polling data, is next to useless. But it doesn’t stop the media from fixating on often-times meaningless numbers to tell a story. Real facts and figures are harder to explain, thus the preferred use of polling numbers.

But hard facts don’t lie. According to the FBI, in 2011 there were 8,583 firearm-related Continue reading “Addressing gun violence one bumper-sticker solution at a time”

Terrorist targets Tampa

The Islamic terrorist who targeted Tampa with his hate hailed from the Baltics where radical factions aren’t all that radical — rather they are the norm. I’ve done consulting work in the region, and I can tell you the culture is a divisive breeding ground for radical behavior.

Terrorist: “pay back” time for wrongs done to Muslims

By Chris Ingram

The Islamic terrorist who targeted Tampa with his hate hailed from the Baltics where radical factions aren’t all that radical — rather they are the norm. I’ve done consulting work in the region, and I can tell you the culture is a divisive breeding ground for extremists.

Mug shot of Sami Osmakac

According to the criminal complaint filed by the FBI (click here to read), accused terrorist Sami Osmakac said, among other things, that he wanted to “pay back” for wrongs done to Muslims. “We all have to die, why not die the Islamic way?”  “…they can take me in 5 million pieces.” The accused planned to take hostages, targeted Ybor city bars, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office operations center, and bridges between Tampa and St. Pete. At one point he told an FBI informant, “I know a lot of places where it gets real crowded.” Continue reading “Terrorist targets Tampa”

Why Marco Rubio’s lies matter

A fellow Cuban-American’s perspective on Florida’s junior senator’s latest tall tale

(Editor’s note: The following commentary was written by Patrick Monteiga, editor of Tampa’s La Gaceta newspaper, the only tri-lingual newspaper in the United States. The column appeared in today’s edition. Moteiga and his family are of Cuban ancestory. The column is reprinted with permission).

A fellow Cuban-American’s perspective on Florida’s junior senator’s latest tall tale

(Editor’s note: The following commentary was written by Patrick Monteiga, editor of Tampa’s La Gaceta newspaper, the only tri-lingual newspaper in the United States. The column appeared in today’s edition. Monteiga and his family are of Cuban ancestory. The column is reprinted with permission).

Sen. Marco Rubio at CPAC. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

The revelations from Marc Rubio’s family history have brought us closer to the U.S. Senator than we’ve ever been before. You see, the real version of Rubio’s heritage closely resembles the Manteiga heritage.

My grandfather Victoriano, like Rubio’s dad and mom, came from Cuba to the U.S. for a job and a better life. My grandfather came in 1913 (at least that’s the story) and was hired by the workers at the Morgan Cigar Factory as the lector. Rubio’s father, Mario, came over in 1956 and found a bartending job.

Victoriano wanted to stay here permanently and become a U.S. citizen, but he was still interested in the family and friends left behind in Cuba. Mario seemed to follow the same creed.

Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista was hated by my grandfather who hoped Fidel Castro would bring better days to Cuba. Mario left in 1956 during the reign of Batista supposedly because of the violence and uncertainty. It seems he also hoped that Castro would change things for the better.

In 1961, after Castro resumed relations with the USSR and nationalized American oil companies and  sugar interests, Rubio’s mom, Oriales, went back to either look after a relative or to see if things were better in Cuba so her family could move back depending on the version of the story. Odd, considering that most observers could see Cuba slipping towards Soviet-style communism by then. Continue reading “Why Marco Rubio’s lies matter”