For voter suppression, take I-95 north

The reaction to last month’s Supreme Court ruling that rendered Section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act unconstitutional was full of typical hyperbole about the impact the court’s decision will have on minority voting rights.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune, Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The reaction to last month’s Supreme Court ruling that rendered Section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act unconstitutional was full of typical hyperbole about the impact the court’s decision will have on minority voting rights.

The overturned section related to the formula by which nine states and some jurisdictions in other states (including just six counties in Florida) are brought under Section 5, which requires them to get federal permission – “preclearance” – for even the most minor changes in voting procedures.

In his opinion, Chief Justice Roberts wrote Section 4 “[uses] obsolete statistics,” and that the coverage formula “violates the constitution.”

To wit, the Supreme Court did not overturn the act itself, just Section 4, and effectively Section 5. Congress is free to consider rewriting the law, though if it wants to ensure fair voting it should look elsewhere.

Such as the 15 states (mostly in the Northeast and in states that strongly tend to favor Democrats), that don’t permit any form of early voting or “no-excuse needed” vote by mail (previously referred to as “absentee” voting). Among those states are New York, Massachusetts, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

Despite the fact that these Democratic Party-leaning states have more restrictive voting opportunities than Florida, our state and its Republican elected officials are frequently vilified by the media for so-called “voter suppression.”

While the state Legislature did tighten some of the rules regarding early voting in 2011, it reinstated most of them this year. But even under the pre-reinstated laws, Florida had far less-restrictive elections than in 15 states, as well as some others that permit early voting and/or no-excuse mail balloting but that are more restrictive than Florida’s.

Yet the liberal mainstream media rarely looks in its own backyard. It’s much easier to label Florida’s legislators and our governor as right-wing voter suppressors than it is to do a little research and then point out that Florida has some of the most progressive voting laws in the country – all of which were instituted by Republicans (not Democrats), and that New York (home of the liberal mainstream media) has among the most oppressive voting laws in the country.

For example, the Obama Network (aka MSNBC), noted in a propaganda report that the effort to overturn provisions of the Voting Rights Act Continue reading “For voter suppression, take I-95 north”

Bill Nelson’s big fat lie about Social Security

Senator Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) is engaging in typical Democrat party scare tactics by suggesting Republicans are engaging in a risky scheme to privatize the depression-era social welfare program.

He knows you’ve been scammed, but won’t admit it

By Chris Ingram

Senator Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) is engaging in typical Democrat party scare tactics by suggesting Republicans are engaging in a risky scheme to privatize the depression-era social welfare program.

The problem with Senator Nelson and his ilk in the Democrat party is that their tactic is not only misleading, but they are also lying about the law regarding Social Security entitlement, and, most importantly, they lack any honest proposals to extend the life of the program.

Social Security = legalized government theft

Earlier today I received the following unsolicited e-mail from Senator Nelson’s congressional office: Continue reading “Bill Nelson’s big fat lie about Social Security”

Still Hope for Halting Heathcare Entitlement

So now that the Pelosi led Congress has passed H.R. 3590 by hook or crook and behind closed doors and against the will of the American people by the narrowest of margins, it now awaits for President Obama to sign it into law. Fortunately for the American people, the battle for socialized health care is not over.

This little thing called the Constitution may stop Obamacare in its tracks

By Gregory M. Williams

The House has now joined the Senate to pass H.R. 3590, unconstitutional legislation to forcibly impose socialized health care upon the American people against their wishes.  The bill now awaits President Obama’s signature to become law. 

So now that the Pelosi led Congress has passed H.R. 3590 by hook or crook and behind closed doors and against the will of the American people by the narrowest of margins, it now awaits for President Obama to sign it into law.  Fortunately for the American people, the battle for socialized health care is not over.  Continue reading “Still Hope for Halting Heathcare Entitlement”

Does the G.O.P. Wear a Thinking Cap or a Dunce Cap?

It’s easy to see why conservatives are frustrated. Maybe that’s why they threw tea bags at the White House instead of discussing a platform on taxation. But this kind of erratic, pundit-driven development simply doesn’t work. Over the next five weeks, Congress stands poised to tackle climate change, health care, and a Supreme Court nomination. The minority won’t technically win any of these fights, so they really only have one viable option: go back to the drafting table and start working. (Either that or start a betting ring on who’ll go crazy next.)

Actually, what the party needs are fewer spotlights and more desk lamps

By Kelsey Stapler

There are some who believe those in high office should be held to a higher standard. Given recent events, however, Republican voters might just settle for officials to stay within the margins of polite society. Conservatives’ resignation (or worse, denial) in the face of political falling stars threatens to become the GOP’s next biggest problem.

Of course, politicians are human. They screw up, have affairs, quit their jobs early, and fly to Argentina just like the rest of us. But the bizarre antics of Ensign, Sanford, Palin, and others are also vintage examples of image trumping intelligence. Continue reading “Does the G.O.P. Wear a Thinking Cap or a Dunce Cap?”

Limp-Noodle Republicans

You know what really fries my green tomatoes about this? The fact that the conservatives who oppose this nomination couldn’t give a Hoover Dam about Ms. Sotmayor’s race. With her judicial record and activist “empathies,” conservatives would oppose her if she was Sen. Orrin “Whitebread” Hatch himself. Indeed, the only people who seem obsessed with Judge Sotomayor’s racial heritage are the people who nominated her and the limp-noodle Republicans who are scared to death to criticize her.

The G.O.P. versus Senora Sotomayor

By Chuck Muth

Picture Gen. Lee’s army in full battle retreat, bugles blaring, white flags blowing wildly in the wind, hound dogs barking and yelping among the thundering hooves of panicked horses running for their lives with pots and pans clanging loudly as they’re dragged through the dirt, kicking up giant clouds of dust.

Now picture the modern-day GOP’s present position in the battle over Judge Sonia Sotomayor’s nomination to the United States Supreme Court.

Not much difference, is there? Continue reading “Limp-Noodle Republicans”

Explaining a monumental election loss in Florida

The GOP has to remember to save our ammunition for the big fights – appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court. The more moderate we appear before the public now, the more Americans will recognize that we are making legitimate arguments when Obama tries to appoint extreme liberals to the U.S. Supreme Court. The more moderate we are on the “small stuff,” the more credibility we will have fighting the big battles.

Where does the GOP go from here?

By Jamie Miller

After much hand-wringing about the election results, Republicans turn toward the task of rebuilding the GOP as a brand voters will trust. Many pundits ask, “Where does the GOP go from here?” I think the better question is, “Who will lead the GOP and in which direction?”

Pundits have already started looking toward the 2012 election while apparently ignoring the importance of the off-year 2010 elections and the redistricting which follows. If we ignore the redistricting process that will be in place for 2012, the GOP will certainly find itself in the minority throughout the next decade. Continue reading “Explaining a monumental election loss in Florida”