A Christmas wish list

I only want a handful of things for Christmas, and fortunately for my loved ones, they didn’t have to fight people at the mall at 4 a.m. on Black Friday to get me what I want. Because nothing I want is sold in stores.

This year’s list includes Charlie Crist!

Photo: Charlie Crist
Photo: Charlie Crist

 

By Chris Ingram

With Thanksgiving past us, it’s time to start thinking about Christmas.

I only want a handful of things for Christmas, and fortunately for my loved ones, they didn’t have to fight people at the mall at 4 a.m. on Black Friday to get me what I want. Because nothing I want is sold in stores.

Here’s my hodge-podge list of what I want for Christmas.

Fix our roads. I would ask for less traffic on our area roads, but that isn’t going to happen. So instead, I am asking for a few things related to traffic that we can all do to make our roads safer and less congested.

First, I wish that everyone who feels the need to instantly respond to Tweets, texts, emails, and Facebook postings on their mobile device while driving, would put the darned things down and just drive before they rear-end someone and make some trial lawyer rich.

Second, I’m asking that people who feel the need to Continue reading “A Christmas wish list”

Marco and the Road Runner

Just how different the concerns and interests of Cubans compared to Mexicans are is evident in how differently they are treated by our government.

The so-called “wet-foot, dry-foot” immigration policy of the United States is a perfect example. It says any Cuban who illegally enters the country and sets their foot on dry land is automatically entitled to a fast track to permanent residency.

 By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune
May 18, 2013

Having Sen. Marco Rubio as the champion of the immigration reform bill Congress is considering is akin to asking the Road Runner to be in charge of speed limits. Here’s why: Rubio is Cuban. Being Cuban means he is Hispanic. Republicans have a huge problem in appealing to Hispanics. Ergo, Rubio is the savior of the party who will help it win the Hispanic vote.

Problem is, although Rubio is Continue reading “Marco and the Road Runner”

Committed to Crist, or should Crist be committed?

Make no mistake, Crist once was a real threat. Then Republicans showed him the door following the Jim Greer fiasco, and after his multiple flip-flops on lifelong conservative positions, not to mention the infamous hug.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Sunday, April 7, 2013

A moose is an animal with horns on the front of its head and a hunting-lodge wall on its back. So goes an old laugh line.

These days, Charlie Crist is the moose of Florida politics. He appears to be a threat for sure, though he is not threatening at all once you turn on the lights and see the hunting-lodge wall on his back.

Make no mistake, Crist once was a real threat. Then Republicans showed him the door following the Jim Greer fiasco, and after his multiple flip-flops on lifelong conservative positions, not to mention the infamous hug.

Today, Crist and his smiling face, with his perfectly coiffed silver hair, glows on billboards for ubiquitous trial lawyer John Morgan. Crist now works for Morgan’s law firm. His mug frequently replaces Morgan’s on TV, allowing Crist to maintain a high profile as he pitches being Continue reading “Committed to Crist, or should Crist be committed?”

Fit to vote? Take this elections and politics quiz

What if you had to pass a knowledge quiz in order to have the right to vote? Some say it’s not a bad idea because there are a lot of people who have no idea about how our government or politics really work. Would you pass the test? Here are 10 questions to see if you’re a knowledgeable and qualified voter.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Published Saturday, October 27, 2012

What if you had to pass a knowledge quiz in order to have the right to vote? Some say it’s not a bad idea because there are a lot of people who have no idea about how our government or politics really work. Would you pass the test? Here are 10 questions to see if you’re a knowledgeable and qualified voter.

1. True or false: The only thing more boring than last Monday night’s debate is Continue reading “Fit to vote? Take this elections and politics quiz”

When the mischief is already done

Enter Dave Weldon.

By Chris Ingram

The Tampa Tribune

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Up until May 18, Florida Republicans were basically facing a choice between just two candidates for the party’s nomination to the U.S. Senate to challenge Bill Nelson in November.

Although Cornelius McGillicuddy IV (aka: Connie Mack) lacks accomplishment, he has been the presumptive front-runner in the race, while George LeMieux has worked tirelessly to get Republican voters to forget that he used to be Charlie Crist’s right-hand man.

After watching the field of previous candidates fail to make traction, Mack got in relatively late. But given that his father was a member of Congress from Florida for 18 years, he has been able to take advantage of daddy’s hard work and reputation to rise to the top.

But all that rises to the top isn’t necessarily the cream of the crop. Mack was born with a Continue reading “When the mischief is already done”

Why Marco Rubio’s lies matter

A fellow Cuban-American’s perspective on Florida’s junior senator’s latest tall tale

(Editor’s note: The following commentary was written by Patrick Monteiga, editor of Tampa’s La Gaceta newspaper, the only tri-lingual newspaper in the United States. The column appeared in today’s edition. Moteiga and his family are of Cuban ancestory. The column is reprinted with permission).

A fellow Cuban-American’s perspective on Florida’s junior senator’s latest tall tale

(Editor’s note: The following commentary was written by Patrick Monteiga, editor of Tampa’s La Gaceta newspaper, the only tri-lingual newspaper in the United States. The column appeared in today’s edition. Monteiga and his family are of Cuban ancestory. The column is reprinted with permission).

Sen. Marco Rubio at CPAC. Photo by Gage Skidmore.

The revelations from Marc Rubio’s family history have brought us closer to the U.S. Senator than we’ve ever been before. You see, the real version of Rubio’s heritage closely resembles the Manteiga heritage.

My grandfather Victoriano, like Rubio’s dad and mom, came from Cuba to the U.S. for a job and a better life. My grandfather came in 1913 (at least that’s the story) and was hired by the workers at the Morgan Cigar Factory as the lector. Rubio’s father, Mario, came over in 1956 and found a bartending job.

Victoriano wanted to stay here permanently and become a U.S. citizen, but he was still interested in the family and friends left behind in Cuba. Mario seemed to follow the same creed.

Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista was hated by my grandfather who hoped Fidel Castro would bring better days to Cuba. Mario left in 1956 during the reign of Batista supposedly because of the violence and uncertainty. It seems he also hoped that Castro would change things for the better.

In 1961, after Castro resumed relations with the USSR and nationalized American oil companies and  sugar interests, Rubio’s mom, Oriales, went back to either look after a relative or to see if things were better in Cuba so her family could move back depending on the version of the story. Odd, considering that most observers could see Cuba slipping towards Soviet-style communism by then. Continue reading “Why Marco Rubio’s lies matter”

Rubio’s pattern of pathological behavior is pervasive

A Cuban-American U.S. Senator who doesn’t know what year Castro came to power: Priceless

Lies, bad judgment, blaming others for his mistakes

By Chris Ingram

Double-billing taxpayers for a few flights to Tallahassee: a couple hundred bucks

New wood floors in the family’s Miami home paid for with an RPOF American Express card: $4,000

Caption: Who can I blame for this mess?

Landing a part-time job as a college professor when other professors are being laid-off: $69,000

A Cuban-American U.S. Senator who Continue reading “Rubio’s pattern of pathological behavior is pervasive”